Category: Trends

  • The real estate market has been roaring back from the Great Recession for years now and 2017 was no different. More specifically, the housing market among those 55 and better has been setting records, which comes as no surprise when you consider strong performance of the housing market and the increasing number of Baby Boomers reaching retirement age. Because of this, we’re not only seeing strong indicators that the market is currently healthy, but also that it will remain healthy for a long while.
  • Many think of technological advancements as a one-way street, forever onward and upward. To be sure, once clever new bits of tech like answering machines and boxes of neatly arranged punch cards have likely been relegated to the scrapheap of history for good. There are, however, some bits of technology that hold on long past the expiration dates set by experts in the field and, in some cases, even the manufacturers of the products themselves. Whether it’s nostalgia of the users, the timelessness of their designs, or some people simply rediscovering technology of days past, some technology is frankly too good to simply fade away. What follows are bits of tech you’ll undoubtedly remember from your youth that have experienced surprising second acts in their long lives.
  • Pickleball continues to be one of the most popular activities at many active adult communities across the country. Some of that popularity comes from the game’s simplicity: pickleball only requires a paddle, ball, and a small court (about a third of the size of a tennis court), and is virtually similar to all racquet sports, which makes it extremely familiar and easy to learn. The smaller court size allows players to play in close proximity to each other, which increases social interaction and decreases chances for injury.

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  • As 2016 comes to a close, retirees can look forward to all that 2017 has to offer. Although the future is uncertain, real estate experts are making predictions for what’s to come in the top real estate markets for 2017. Despite a moderate to slow pace for next year’s housing market, industry experts predict that a large population growth and a strong local economy are some of the driving factors that are making some of these housing markets thrive. According to realtor.com’s housing trends for 2017, Millennials and Boomers will be the driving force in some of these regions. While Millennials flock to cities like Boston and Los Angeles to purchase their new homes, Boomers approaching retirement and becoming empty nesters are making an impact in metro areas like Phoenix, AZ and in Jacksonville and Orlando, FL. Retirees may want to check out these top housing areas if they are thinking of buying their dream home in an active adult community next year.
  • Innovative kitchen designs have always attracted active adult homebuyers who enjoy cooking gourmet meals and entertaining guests. It’s the heart of the home where friends and family gatherings occur on a daily basis. It’s also no surprise that homeowners want their kitchen to look its best and stay on top of the latest trends. So what are the new kitchen trends for 2016? Soothing and muted colors, bold fixtures, functional designs, and integrated spaces are just some of the newest kitchen trends happening this year.
  • We’ve all heard of the term man cave and have seen a spare bedroom, garage, basement, or den transform into this male retreat. But what about a woman’s man cave? If men can have their man cave for their own personal getaway then why can’t women have their own version of it too? Well, there is a new trend on the rise called a she shed which is an alternative to the man cave that provides a relaxing oasis many women seek for themselves. She sheds are becoming more popular because it allows for women to shed the stresses of the daily grind by having their own space where they can be creative, enjoy new hobbies, or sit and meditate in peace and quiet. This female sanctuary is the perfect area where women can carve out some time for themselves without spouses or children intruding and disrupting their solo quality time.
  • When active adult communities got their start in the 1960s, they were typically designed as sprawling developments with requisite golf courses and tennis courts. They were large developments in suburban or more rural settings. Today, developers are catering to different needs. They know that active adults have diverse interests and that smaller communities still have a lot to offer.
  • All across the Midwest and Northeast, active adults have felt the bite of winter storms. And while those who live in northern regions are used to shoveling snow, recent winter storms have been far from typical. Dangerous white-out conditions grounded flights and prompted many states to advise residents to stay home. Yet, for many, being at home meant coping with extensive power outages. Was all of this enough to drive retirees south?

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